C-TPAT Minimum Security Criteria and Guidelines

Air Carriers
- 03/15/2012
To qualify, your company must be an active air carrier that transports (within the past year) cargo shipments to the United States. Your company must possess an active International Air Transport Association (IATA) Code and have a (valid) continuous international carrier bond registered with CBP.

Air Freight Consolidators, Ocean Transport Intermediaries, and Non_Vessel Operating Common Carriers (NVOCC)
- 03/15/2012
To qualify, your company must be an active Air Freight Consolidator, Ocean Transportation Intermediary or Non-Vessel Operating Common Carrier (NVOCC), have an office staffed in the U.S., and must also possess a valid continuous international carrier bond and/or in bond/export Consolidator bond (IBEC) registered with CBP. Also, if applicable, companies must have an active Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) issued Organization Number or an International Air Transport Association (IATA) issued Organization Number.

Foreign Manufacturers
- 03/16/2012
To qualify, your company must be an active Manufacturer incorporated in Mexico or Canada with an active (exported goods within the past year) U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Manufacturer Identification (MID) Number. The foreign manufacturer must also have a designated company officer that will be the primary cargo security officer responsible for C-TPAT.

Highway Carriers
- 03/16/2012
To qualify, your company must be an active highway carrier that crosses internationally (within the past year) into/from Mexico or Canada. You must have at least one staffed business office in one of the three countries and have an active U.S. National Motor Freight Traffic Association (NMFTA) issued Standard Carrier Alpha Code (SCAC) and Department of Transportation Number (DOT). When applying, carriers will be designated as either Mexican or Canadian based on where the company crosses goods. If your company crosses freight on both borders, you should apply under the Mexican Carrier designation.

Importers
- 03/16/2012
To qualify, your company must be an active U.S. importer (imported goods within the past year) with an active U.S. Importer of Record ID (IOR) and have a (valid) registered continuous import bond with CBP. Canadian companies that have been designated a Non-Resident Canadian Importer also qualify. You must have at least one staffed business office in either of the two countries. Very low volume importers (less than 24 importations) will be considered on a case by case basis.

Marine Port Authority and Terminal Operators
- 03/16/2012
To qualify, your company must be an active (within the past year) U.S. Marine or Port Terminal Operator with an active Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) Marine Terminal Operator (MTO) Number. You must have a business office staffed in the U.S.

Rail Carriers
- 03/16/2012
To qualify, your company must be an active rail carrier that transports shipments internationally (within the past year) into/from Mexico or Canada. You must have at least one staffed business office in one of the three countries. Your company must have an active U.S. National Motor Freight Traffic Association (NMFTA) issued Standard Carrier Alpha Code (SCAC) and have a (valid) common carrier bond registered with CBP.

Sea Carriers
- 03/16/2012
To qualify, your company must be an active Sea carrier that transports shipments internationally (within the past year) into the United States. Your company must have an active Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) VOCC Number, an active U.S. National Motor Freight Traffic Association issued Standard Carrier Alpha Code (SCAC), and must also possess a valid continuous international carrier bond registered with CBP.

Third Party Logistics Providers (3PL)
- 03/16/2012
To qualify, your company must be licensed and/or bonded by the Federal Maritime Commission, Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, or the Department of Transportation; be directly involved in the handling and management of the cargo throughout any point in the international supply chain, from point of stuffing, up to the first U.S. port of arrival; Manage and execute these particular logistics functions using its own transportation, consolidation and/or warehousing assets and resources, on behalf of the client company; and have an office staffed in the United States.